Tag Archives: Red Card

Wales see Red as Aussie Gold have Black night…

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After five intense weeks, 46 matches, 256 tries, 18 yellow cards and two controversial red cards, the Rugby World Cup is down to the very pointy end – and a re-run of the inaugural final from 1987.

Wales were heartbroken by their narrow 1 point loss to France following the 17th minute red card for Welsh skipper Sam Warburton by Irish referee Alain Rolland, which has caused some controversy.

In 2007, the IRB approved a Law clarification which essentially made it clear that tackles involving a player being lifted off the ground and tipped horizontally, and were then either forced or dropped to the ground, were illegal and constitute dangerous play.

The summary for possible sanction scenarios when a tackler horizontally lifts a player off the ground are:

1. The player is lifted and then forced or “speared” into the ground. A red card should be issued for this type of tackle.
2. The lifted player is dropped to the ground from a height with no regard to the player’s safety. A red card should be issued for this type of tackle.
3. For all other types of dangerous lifting tackles, it may be considered a penalty or yellow card is sufficient.

Referees have been instructed not to make decisions based on what they consider was the intention of the offending player, but based on an objective assessment (as per Law 10.4 (e)) of the circumstances of the tackle.

The difficulty for players, coaches, fans, and indeed referees, is that contextual judgement and materiality is ruled out.

Was it a dangerous tackle? Yes?
Was it cynical and deliberate? No.
Was it a yellow? Maybe.

It was a very cruel way to end what has been a great tournament for Wales who deserved to make the final and would undoubtedly have pushed the All Blacks further than France seem likely to do.

As for the All Blacks, they face France in a re-run of the first World Cup final (when they prevailed 29-9). A very one sided semi-final against the Tasman rivals from Australia failed to spark into life on a damp night in Auckland, and Quade Cooper struggled to ignite the Wallabies.

It wasn’t a free flowing game, despite a sparkling and powerful start by the ABs who scored a stunning try just 6 minutes in and threatened to run riot. Australia kept them at bay and they didn’t threaten the try line again – and were content with a workman-like and deserved victory to reach their third final.

That final will be managed by Craig Joubert who has had a magnificent World Cup and deserves his place behind the whistle on Sunday. By the time he blows the final whistle of the 2011 tournament, New Zealand should be crowned champions and send a nation into celebrations 24 years in the making.

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It started with a kick…

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Well the season proper has kicked off and the World Cup is on the cusp of monopolising the next six weeks. The Aussies have announced their pedigree to lift the Webb Ellis again and send the All Blacks into another four years of therapy. England finished off Ireland’s hopes and left them in a record low of eighth on the IRB Rankings – their lowest ever position.

The Wallabies victory was memorable for the role reversal in approach – with Australia running the ball and looking to counter attack at every opportunity. The blew New Zealand off the park in the first 40 mins before taking the foot of the pedal after the break. The main talking point was the innocuous knee to the head of Richie McCaw by Quade Cooper.

The attempt was pretty lame, but deliberate and Cooper was lucky (and relived) to be cleared by the citiing committee post match. The Aussies now enter the World Cup as growing favourites to win a third title.

Whilst the players and spectators prepare for the tournament to start, the rest of us have started a new season at grass roots. Following on from three good warm-up matches, the weekend saw the first round of the county cup competition. I took charge of a good local derby which turned out to be a tense affair in which the tumultuous weather played second fiddle to a bizarre incident late in the match.

After a break from their own line, the away team galloped up field before their dashing winger was tackled heavily into touch. This tackle was taken in poor spirit by the other players and the obligatory derby handbags were waved. During the episode their was an attempt to re-enact the ‘karate kid’ by one of the home team, leading to stunned silence from all present and an early bath. It was an odd moment in a brilliant match, which the home side managed to pinch at the death, playing out of their skins with a player short.

This week sees the obligatory RFU fitness (frustration!) test and then a trip down the M62 for another local derby. Hopefully they will stick to just kicking the ball and not each other….